Which Statement Describes The Environmental Impact Of Developing Countries common but differentiated responsibilities | international environmental law

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common but differentiated responsibilities | international environmental law

common but differentiated responsibilities (CBDR), principle of international environmental law establishing that all states are responsible for addressing global environmental destruction yet not equally responsible. The principle balances, on the one hand, the need for all states to take responsibility for global environmental problems and, on the other hand, the need to recognize the wide differences in levels of economic development between states. These differences in turn are linked to the states’ contributions to, as well as their abilities to address, these problems. CBDR was formalized in international law at the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio de Janeiro.CBDR resolves a tension between two older notions of environmental governance. On the one hand, the idea of a “common responsibility” spoke directly to the notion of “common heritage of mankind,” acknowledged by a 1967 UN resolution that had first emerged as an expression of concern for the loss of natural resources belonging to all (especially maritime, such as whales and tuna). The 1992 UN negotiations were organized around the four key themes of climate change, deforestation, desertification, and biodiversity degradation—environmental problems whose global repercussions brought home the need for a collective response, which needed in turn to be grounded in a common responsibility. In legal terms, CBDR describes the shared obligation of two or more states toward the protection of a particular environmental resource. On the other hand, the need to establish variegated levels at which different states can effectively enter into a collective response, according to both their capacities and their levels of contribution to the problem, had been recognized since the first UN conference on the environment, in 1972 (it was featured explicitly in the Stockholm Declaration).At the practical level, CBDR emerged at the 1992 conference as a compromise between the positions of developed and developing countries with regard to environmental protection. It aims at bringing about the conditions of environmental governance that, to be effective, need to be as inclusive as possible. At the ethical level, it is an expression of general principles of equity in international law. It recognizes the historical correlation between higher levels of development and a greater contribution to the degradation of global environmental resources, such as water and air, and enables the sharing of responsibility accordingly. It establishes that developed countries, which had been able to develop for longer times unimpeded by environmental restrictions, now need to take a greater share of responsibility.The various occurrences of the CBDR in international legal texts include the Rio Declaration, where it is enunciated as “Principle 7,” and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, together with its 1997 Kyoto Protocol. It was retroactively incorporated into the Vienna Convention and Montreal Protocol on substances that destroy the ozone layer. Practically, it entails the deferral of developing countries’ compliance with the objectives of these environmental conventions.CBDR is not unanimously accepted among developed countries. At the Rio negotiations it was rejected by the United States, which has since conditioned its participation in any restrictive scheme on a specific commitment from developing countries to participate as well (the 1997 Byrd-Hagel Resolution). As a result of this lack of consensus, CBDR has been relatively sidelined in environmental governance debates.

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